The Future is Now

With Michael C. Hall

Why this story needs to be told

I recognized a sort of collective sense of shame that we, as a culture, live with for the impact we have on the environment. We are complicit in environmental change in a way that people in Bangladesh certainly are not.

Michael C. Hall
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Michael C. Hall investigates the impact of rising sea levels on a community of women living and working on a shrinking island.

Michael C. Hall investigates the impact of rising sea levels on a community of women living and working on a shrinking island.

Introduction

In The Future is Now, we learn that by 2050, experts predict the migration of upwards of 150 million people worldwide will be the single most worrisome impact of our climate-changed future.

From LA, where he’s relatively safe from these predictions, Michael C. Hall journeys to the low-lying deltaic country of Bangladesh, where the future is now. Rising seas are expected to submerge 17% of this nation, the worlds’ most vulnerable to climate change.

SHOOT LOCATION(S):

Los Angeles, CA; Bangladesh

Meet The Characters

Because of Cyclones Aila and Sidr there was a lot of damage in my village. My family was facing a lot of difficulties.

Shahidul Islam Climate Migrant, Rana Plaza Survivor

The Science Behind The Story

Bangladesh sits at the foot of the Himalayas and at the confluence of three major river systems (Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna) making its geography unique and vulnerable to climate change. Around 80% of the country is located in floodplains and nearly 25% of its land is less than 7 feet above sea level.

Source Learn more about Sea Level Rise

Share Your Story

The YEARS team is committed to covering stories about how we’re all impacted by climate change. Let us know if you see something you’d like us to investigate.