Michael Oppenheimer

Science Advisor

Michael Oppenheimer

Science Advisor

Michael Oppenheimer is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University. He is the Director of the Program in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) at the Woodrow Wilson School and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program,Princeton Environmental Institute, and the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies.

Oppenheimer joined the Princeton faculty after more than two decades with The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), a non-governmental, environmental organization, where he served as chief scientist and manager of the Climate and Air Program.  He continues to serve as a science advisor to EDF.

Oppenheimer is a long-time participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007, serving recently as a lead author of the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report and now as a coordinating lead author of SREX, a special report on extreme climate events and disasters. He is currently a coordinating author of the Fifth Assessment Report .

Michael Oppenheimer has been a member of several panels of the National Academy of Sciences and is now a member of the National Academies’ Board on Energy and Environmental Studies. He is also a winner of the 2010 Heinz Award and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

His interests include science and policy of the atmosphere, particularly climate change and its impacts. Much of his research aims to understand the potential for “dangerous” outcomes of increasing levels of greenhouse gases by exploring the effects of global warming on the ice sheets and sea level, on the risk from coastal storms,and on patterns of human migration. He also studies the process of scientific learning and scientific assessments and their role in problems of global change.

In the late 1980’s, Dr. Oppenheimer and a handful of other scientists organized two workshops under the auspices of the United Nations that helped precipitate the negotiations that resulted in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (signed at the 1992 Earth Summit) and the Kyoto Protocol. During that period, he co-founded the Climate Action Network. His research and advocacy work on acid rain also contributed to the passage of the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act.

Dr. Oppenheimer has been a guest on many television and radio programs, including ABC’s This Week, Nightline, Alcove, The News Hour, The Oprah Winfrey Show, Charlie Rose , ABC News and the Colbert Report.

Prior to his position at The Environmental Defense Fund, Dr. Oppenheimer served as Atomic and Molecular Astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Lecturer on Astronomy at Harvard University. He received an S.B. in chemistry from M.I.T., a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Chicago, and pursued post-doctoral research at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Oppenheimer is the author of over 120 articles published in professional journals and is co-author (with Robert H. Boyle) of a 1990 book, Dead Heat:The Race Against The Greenhouse Effect.

Michael Mann

Science Advisor

Michael Mann

Science Advisor

Michael (Mike) Mann is director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center and a member of the Penn State University faculty, holding joint positions in the Departments of Meteorology and Geosciences, and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute. Dr. Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Meteorology at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department ofGeosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute(EESI).He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

Dr. Mann received his undergraduate degrees in Physics and Applied Math from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. degree in Physics from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University. His research involves the use of theoretical models and observational data to better understand Earth’s climate system.

Dr. Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Meteorology at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

Dr. Mann received his undergraduate degrees in Physics and Applied Math from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. degree in Physics from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University. His research involves the use of theoretical models and observational data to better understand Earth’s climate system.

Dr. Mann was a Lead Author on the Observed Climate Variability and Change chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report in 2001 and was organizing committee chair for the National Academy of Sciences Frontiers of Science in 2003. He has received a number of honors and awards including NOAA’s outstanding publication award in 2002 and selection by Scientific American as one of the fifty leading visionaries in science and technology in 2002.

He contributed, with other IPCC authors, to the award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was awarded the Hans Oeschger Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2012 and was awarded the National Conservation Achievement Award for science by the National Wildlife Federation in 2013. He made Bloomberg News’ list of fifty most influential people in 2013. He is a Fellow of both the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society.

Dr. Mann is author of more than 160 peer-reviewed and edited publications, and has published two books including Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming in 2008 and The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines in 2012. He is also a co-founder and avid contributor to the award-winning science website RealClimate.org.

Radley Horton

Science Advisor

Radley Horton

Science Advisor

Dr. Radley Horton is a climate scientist at the Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University. His research interests include regional climate projections, sea level rise, extreme climate events, loss of Arctic sea ice and its implications, and adaptation to climate variability and change.

For NASA, Radley generates and presents regionally and locally downscaled climate projections, and co-generates climate impact and adaptation information through interaction with decision-makers during workshops for institutional stewards at NASA’s Centers. Radley is a Convening Lead Author for the Third National Climate Assessment, Northeast Chapter. He is also deputy to the Lead for NASA’s Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group, charged with linking NASA’s science to its institutional stewardship.

He served as the Climate Science Lead for the New York City Panel on Climate Change, and is a Co-Lead for the NOAA-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast. Radley is also the Columbia University lead for the Department of Interior-funded Northeast Climate Science Center.

Radley has co-led the development of a global research agenda in support of the United Nations Environmental Program’s Programme on Vulnerability, Impacts, and Adaptation (PROVIA) initiative.   Radley is also a Co-PI on an NSF funded Climate Change Education Partnership Project.

Radley also teaches in Columbia University’s Sustainable Development department.

Katharine Hayhoe

Science Advisor

Katharine Hayhoe

Science Advisor

Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist whose research focuses on developing and applying high-resolution climate projections to understand what climate change means for people and the natural environment. She is an associate professor and director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, and has a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Toronto and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Illinois.

Katharine has served as a lead author for the Second and Third U.S. National Climate Assessments, and has conducted climate impact assessments for a broad cross-section of organizations, cities and regions, from Boston Logan Airport to the state of California. Her work has resulted in over 120 peer-reviewed publications that evaluate global climate model performance, develop and compare downscaling approaches, and quantify the impacts of climate change on cities, states, ecosystems, and sectors over the coming century.

She has been named one of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People and the Foreign Policy’s 100 Leading Global Thinkers, as well as one of POLITICO’s 50 thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics. Katharine has also received the National Center for Science Education’s Friend of the Planet award, the American Geophysical Union’s Climate Communication Prize, and the Sierra Club’s Distinguished Service award.

Katharine is currently serving as lead author for the upcoming Fourth National Climate Assessment and producing her new PBS Digital Studios short series, Global Weirding: Climate, Politics and Religion.

James Hansen

Science Advisor

James Hansen

Science Advisor

Dr. James Hansen directs the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City and is Adjunct Professor of Earth Sciences at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He was trained in physics and astronomy in the space science program of Dr. James Van Allen at the University of Iowa, receiving his bachelor’s degree with highest distinction in physics and mathematics, master’s degree in astronomy, and Ph. D. in physics in 1967.

Dr. Hansen was a visiting student, at the Institute of Astrophysics, University of Kyoto and Dept. of Astronomy, Tokyo University, Japan from 1965-1966. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Iowa in 1967.

Except for 1969, when he was an NSF post-doctoral scientist at Leiden Observatory under Prof. H.C. van de Hulst, he has spent his post-doctoral career at NASA GISS. In his early research Dr. Hansen used telescopic observations of Venus to extract detailedinformation on the physical properties of the cloud and haze particles that veil Venus.

Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Hansen has focused on studies and computer simulations of the Earth’s climate, for the purpose of understanding the human impact on global climate. He is best known for his testimony on climate change to Congress in the 1980s that helped raise broad awareness of the global warming issue.

In recent years Dr. Hansen has drawn attention to the danger of passing climate tipping points, producing irreversible climate impacts that would yield a different planet from the one on which civilization developed. Dr. Hansen disputes the contention, of fossil fuel interests and governments that support them, that it is an almost god-given fact that all fossil fuels must be burned with their combustion products discharged into the atmosphere. Instead Dr. Hansen has outlined steps that are needed to stabilize climate, with a cleaner atmosphere and ocean, and he emphasizes the need for the public to influence government and industry policies.

Dr. Hansen was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1995 and, in 2001, received the Heinz Award for environment and the American Geophysical Union’s Roger Revelle Medal. Dr. Hansen received the World Wildlife Federation’s Conservation Medal from the Duke of Edinburgh in 2006 and was designated by Time Magazine as one of the world’s 100 most influential people in 2006.

In 2007 Dr. Hansen won the Dan David Prize in the field of Quest for Energy, the Leo Szilard Award of the American Physical Society for Use of Physics for the Benefit of Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Award for Scientific Freedom and Responsibility.

Charles H. Greene

Science Advisor

Charles H. Greene

Science Advisor

Charles H. Greene is Director of the Ocean Resources and Ecosystems Program, a professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and a fellow at the David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University. His research interests range from the ecological dynamics of marine animal populations to the effects of global climate change on ocean ecosystems and extreme weather. In recent years, he has participated in algal bioenergy research to help develop pathways for transitioning from fossil fuels to more sustainable energy sources. Professor Greene has published a number of recent papers on climate change and energy that are readily accessible to the public, including A Very Inconvenient Truth andSuperstorm Sandy: A Series of Unfortunate Events?  in Oceanography magazine, Geoengineering: The Inescapable Truth of Getting to 350 in Solutions magazine, and the Winters of our Discontent in Scientific American. 

 

Robert Corell

Science Advisor

Robert Corell

Science Advisor

Bob Corell serves as Chair of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment and is a Principal for the Global Environment Technology Foundation.

Dr. Robert W. Corell is a Principal at the Global Environment Technology Foundation and Leads its Center for Energy and Climate Solutions. He has several academic appointments: Senior Fellow, College of Arts and Science and its School of Environment, Arts and Society, Florida International University and Professor II at the Research Institute at the University of the Arctic.

He is the Chair of the Board of Directors of the Digital Universe Foundation and Vice Chancellor of the Academy of Science and Arts. He is a Member of the Modeling Team at Climate Interactive Initiative, Co-Chair of Phase II of the Global Energy Assessment (GEA) and Lead Author of GEA’s Chapter 3 on Environment and Energy.

He is Founder in 2008 and Chair of the Global Climate Action Initiative established to assist international negotiators (US, China, Indonesia, etc.) in the UNFCCC and beyond processes and in 2010, Dr. Corell founded the non-profit Global Science Associates, an interdisciplinary nucleus for the world’s best science experts and collaboratories.

He lead the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (2005) and most recently lead a comprehensive study of governance issues in the circumpolar Arctic, the recommendations of which were adopted in May 2011 by the Arctic Council consisting of the eight ministers of foreign affairs of the eight Arctic nations.

Heidi Cullen

Chief Science Advisor

Heidi Cullen

Chief Science Advisor

Dr. Heidi Cullen serves as Chief Climatologist for Climate Central — a non-profit science journalism organization headquartered in Princeton, NJ. She is a Visiting Lecturer at Princeton University and the author of The Weather of the Future published by Harper Collins.

Before joining Climate Central, where she reports on climate and energy issues, Dr. Cullen served as The Weather Channel’s first on-air climate expert and helped create Forecast Earth, a weekly television series focused on issues related to climate change and the environment.

Prior to that Dr. Cullen worked as a research scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, CO. She received the NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellowship and spent two years at Columbia University’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society working to apply long-range climate forecasts to the water resources sector in Brazil and Paraguay.

She is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society and the Society of Environmental Journalists. Dr. Cullen also serves as a member of the NOAA Science Advisory Board and was recently elected to the AMS Council.

She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering from Columbia University and went on to receive a Ph.D. in climatology and ocean-atmosphere dynamics at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University.

Joseph Romm, Ph.D.

Chief Science Advisor

Joseph Romm, Ph.D.

Chief Science Advisor

Joe Romm, Ph.D. is Chief Science Advisor for the Showtime TV series, “Years of Living Dangerously.” He is also Founding Editor of ClimateProgress.org, which NY Times columnist Tom Friedman called “the indispensable blog.”

In 2009, Rolling Stone put Romm on its list of 100 “people who are reinventing America.” Time named him a “Hero of the Environment″ and “The Web’s most influential climate-change blogger.” In 2008, Romm was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for “distinguished service toward a sustainable energy.”

Romm was Acting Assistant Secretary of Energy for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in 1997, where he oversaw $1 billion in R&D, demonstration, and deployment of low-carbon technology. Romm is the author of eight books on climate change, clean energy, and communications, most recently, “Language Intelligence.”

He has written for the journals Science and Nature, as well as the NY Times, Foreign Affairs, the Atlantic Monthly, Technology Review and Scientific American. Romm is a Senior Fellow at American Progress Action Fund and holds a Ph.D. in physics from MIT.