#Repost @iamnikkireed ・・・ Hey guys happy Sunday! PLEASE take a second to read this post! By now you probably know that every Sunday I donate my social media to my @YearsofLiving team to talk about carbon pricing! This week's post is about the devastating impact the fashion industry has on our planet written by Anna Sorokina, #PutAPriceOnIt Action Team Member. "The average American throws away over 81 pounds of textiles per year, which can take hundreds of years to decompose and end up producing methane in landfills. Worse yet, since clothes are bleached and dyed, chemicals leach into groundwater and soil. Donating, too, is less environmentally-friendly than it seems - charities on average sell less than 10 percent of donations, so the rest is recycled or shipped to the global south for resale, both of which use an impressive amount of fossil fuels. When I learned about the devastating impact of the fashion industry, I stopped buying clothes. If something doesn't quite fit, I hand sew it (which is a great way to watch Netflix and be productive simultaneously). When I no longer like a piece of clothing, I use the fabric to create something new, tweak the design by putting patches on, or do a clothing swap with friends. When I absolutely need a new item, I purchase it from a thrift store. Most importantly, I just don't think of clothes as disposable. I view them as a creative outlet; as a fluid flow of fabric that can be transformed, combined, embellished, and that lives as many lives as I choose to give it." - Years Of Living Dangerously

#Repost @iamnikkireed ・・・ Hey guys happy Sunday! PLEASE take a second to read this post! By now you probably know that every Sunday I donate my social media to my @YearsofLiving team to talk about carbon pricing! This week’s post is about the devastating impact the fashion industry has on our planet written by Anna Sorokina, #PutAPriceOnIt Action Team Member. “The average American throws away over 81 pounds of textiles per year, which can take hundreds of years to decompose and end up producing methane in landfills. Worse yet, since clothes are bleached and dyed, chemicals leach into groundwater and soil. Donating, too, is less environmentally-friendly than it seems — charities on average sell less than 10 percent of donations, so the rest is recycled or shipped to the global south for resale, both of which use an impressive amount of fossil fuels. When I learned about the devastating impact of the fashion industry, I stopped buying clothes. If something doesn’t quite fit, I hand sew it (which is a great way to watch Netflix and be productive simultaneously). When I no longer like a piece of clothing, I use the fabric to create something new, tweak the design by putting patches on, or do a clothing swap with friends. When I absolutely need a new item, I purchase it from a thrift store. Most importantly, I just don’t think of clothes as disposable. I view them as a creative outlet; as a fluid flow of fabric that can be transformed, combined, embellished, and that lives as many lives as I choose to give it.”

#Repost @iamnikkireed ・・・
Hey guys happy Sunday! PLEASE take a second to read this post! By now you probably know that every Sunday I donate my social media to my @YearsofLiving team to talk about carbon pricing! This week’s post is about the devastating impact the fashion industry has on our planet written by Anna Sorokina, #PutAPriceOnIt Action Team Member. “The average American throws away over 81 pounds of textiles per year, which can take hundreds of years to decompose and end up producing methane in landfills. Worse yet, since clothes are bleached and dyed, chemicals leach into groundwater and soil. Donating, too, is less environmentally-friendly than it seems — charities on average sell less than 10 percent of donations, so the rest is recycled or shipped to the global south for resale, both of which use an impressive amount of fossil fuels.
When I learned about the devastating impact of the fashion industry, I stopped buying clothes. If something doesn’t quite fit, I hand sew it (which is a great way to watch Netflix and be productive simultaneously). When I no longer like a piece of clothing, I use the fabric to create something new, tweak the design by putting patches on, or do a clothing swap with friends. When I absolutely need a new item, I purchase it from a thrift store. Most importantly, I just don’t think of clothes as disposable. I view them as a creative outlet; as a fluid flow of fabric that can be transformed, combined, embellished, and that lives as many lives as I choose to give it.”

#Repost @iamnikkireed ・・・
Hey guys happy Sunday! PLEASE take a second to read this post! By now you probably know that every Sunday I donate my social media to my @YearsofLiving team to talk about carbon pricing! This week’s post is about the devastating impact the fashion industry has on our planet written by Anna Sorokina, #PutAPriceOnIt Action Team Member. “The average American throws away over 81 pounds of textiles per year, which can take hundreds of years to decompose and end up producing methane in landfills. Worse yet, since clothes are bleached and dyed, chemicals leach into groundwater and soil. Donating, too, is less environmentally-friendly than it seems — charities on average sell less than 10 percent of donations, so the rest is recycled or shipped to the global south for resale, both of which use an impressive amount of fossil fuels. 
When I learned about the devastating impact of the fashion industry, I stopped buying clothes. If something doesn’t quite fit, I hand sew it (which is a great way to watch Netflix and be productive simultaneously). When I no longer like a piece of clothing, I use the fabric to create something new, tweak the design by putting patches on, or do a clothing swap with friends. When I absolutely need a new item, I purchase it from a thrift store. Most importantly, I just don’t think of clothes as disposable. I view them as a creative outlet; as a fluid flow of fabric that can be transformed, combined, embellished, and that lives as many lives as I choose to give it.”

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